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20120701
20120731
SHOW
Q & A 15
STATION
CSPAN 15
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2012 6:00am EDT
for this interview. your people at the publishing house told us there are all kinds of rules and things we couldn't ask you about. >> you can ask me anything you want but i just won't answer. >> four years ago, we did the interview and we talked about bush v. gore. let me show you some video from a interview you did with pierce morgan. i want you show you this clip. let me just show you this. >> i guess the ways disagreement was bush v. gore. that comes up all the time one usual response is get over it. >> you went on to explain further on that and we did it four years ago. >> did they tell you -- i didn't know that was -- >> we're used to that. we get that all the time. >> i don't mind -- ask me about bush versus gore. >> judges have tenure for life. why does everybody worry about things they say in public and not having cameras in the room and all of that stuff? what are you so sensitive about that? >> i'm sensitive about it because judges ought to express their views on the law in their opinions. everything i had to say about the real legal issues in bush versus gore was set forth in the opini
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2012 11:00pm EDT
-called canons of interpretation, which are largely ancient and common sense rules of how language is used. >> could you expect to read this? >> i hope judges will read it. i hope lawyers will read it. i hope law students will read it. and i hope legislators will read it, because it is just as important that legislators know how their language will be interpreted by the courts as it is for the courts to know how they ought to interpret the language. those are the four. >> you pointed out to me before we started that i am not a lawyer. >> maybe the general public. parts of this are understandable to the general public. parts are not. >> it would give the general reader a window into the world of judges, and of how judges go about deciding on the meaning of enacted tax. maybe most important of all, on what is the true fault line in judges. distinguishing judges, the fault line is not conservative versus liberal. it is, rather, theories of interpretation, which differ greatly from one judge to another, unfortunately. >> i am going to read a long paragraph that you wrote at the end of your pre
CSPAN
Jul 29, 2012 8:00pm EDT
of the interpretive causes that i consider important. no use of legislative history. i have discussed with the opposing theory is of interpretation. most important of all, most difficult of all, i have gone through the steps that a textualist has to take in order to produce the correct reading of the text. the canons of interpretation. large the engine common sense rules of alco language is used. >> who do you expect to read this? >> i hope the judges will read it. i hope lawyers will read it. a of law students will read it. i hope legislators will read it. it is just as important that legislators know how the language will be interpreted by the court as it is for the court to know how they ought to interpret the language. >> he pointed out to me that i am not a lawyer. >> it should give you an formation into the world of judges. on what is the true fault line in judges. distinguishing judges. the fault line is not conservative versus liberal. it is a series of interpretations which differ greatly from one judge to another. >> i am going to read a long paragraph he wrote. "one final p
CSPAN
Jul 8, 2012 8:00pm EDT
leadership, it to anybody that might have listened. >> right away, you say, the war on terror started with us. explain. >> the way i look at it, when you attack buildings or embassies, whether it is the world trade center, the embassies in africa, those are things that represent u.s. interests. when you attack a warship, that is different. that is something that defense u.s. citizens and our interest around the world. when you try to take away and nation's ability to protect itself, it is an act of war. >> let's go back to the beginning. what date was at the ship you were commanding bombed? >> october 12, 2000. >> what were the circumstances? >> we had been operating in the mediterranean for about 6.5 weeks. we had been held back until the last possible minute. consequently, we had to go at a high-speed transit, 30 miles per hour, at double the normal speed. it was because of that transit that as we went through and around the southwest corner of the arabian peninsula, we below 50%. it carries over half a million gallons. we had to find someplace to stop. because of the drawdown in naval forc
CSPAN
Jul 8, 2012 11:00pm EDT
nomination of a judge to the u.s. district court. they will also look at small business taxes. the house is live at 2:00 eastern on c-span and the senate is live >> this week, kirk lippold discusses his book about the attack on the u.s.s. cole, "frontburner." >> why did you take the blame for 9/11 in your book? >> i do nothing to blame but i certainly felt that i bore some responsibility. it was my job years ago when i raised my right hand and swore an oath and swore to defend the constitution. that meant defending my nation. when our country is attacked was on active duty. i had been through a major terrorist incident. i was familiar with al qaeda. i just felt the degree of burden of the i should have been saying or doing something, having been at the focal point of that firestorm on 10-12, october 2001 should have been saying something to our leadership, anybody who high -- might have listened. >> you see the war on terror started with us. when you attack a warship, that is different. that is something that defends u.s. citizens and our interest around the world. when you tr
CSPAN
Jul 16, 2012 6:00am EDT
by the american war department. frank capra was the director. this gives us a sense of the people. >> the pagan pageantry of leaders from all over germany -- hypnotized, they were members of a master race. this film will deal with at one of the nazi bid for power, the most fantastic claim in all recorded history. hitler had seen hirohito grab manchuria and other territory from the chinese. he had watched mussolini get away with the rape of ethiopia. he had seen the democratic world wither away while these aggressions were going on. and he smiled. collective action to enforce peace -- the only weapon they had had broken down. it was time for the nazis to start crossing borders. it was time for hitler to put his plan into action. >> you are right, on page 746, i will jump to the end -- you write, "he screamed, then collapsed in a chair." a different image of adolf hitler than we saw there. what happened at the end? >> hitler had been defying reality. he was in total denial, psychologically. he realized by 1944-1945 that the war would end in berlin. at that particular state, when he burst into tea
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2012 8:00pm EDT
-era law that had separated investment banking from commercial banking, protecting us from bankers pretty well for 70 years. finally, he and his friend robert rubin drove a stake through glass-steagall. it was dead and gone. then he began a massive empire known as travelers group, which the merged with citigroup. he was a beneficiary of the elimination of glass-steagall. >> use it at rob rubin, who was treasury secretary, went back after that. was it a $100 million job? >> $115 million over time, being an eminence grise at the board who did not have to do much but certainly made a lot of money. >> robert rubin is a democrat. alan greenspan is a republican, or something on the other side, right of center. is this a political matter? >> this is, again, across the aisle. home ownership was push that really involves both democrats and republicans, private-sector and public-sector. it was a push that asked regulators to team up with the regulated entities, which was highly unusual. so it was all-in. to push home -- home ownership to -- clinton wanted it to be 70% in the year 2000. he did not g
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2012 6:00am EDT
was, he said, "i just feel a little slow. mentally, i used to be a steak knife. now, i am a butter knife." i thought that really sums upper what so many combat veterans are experiencing. they are just not the same. even as their physical wounds healed, the mental trauma goes on. >> inevitably, the frustration turned them on each other. sheryl would prod him to be more active. he would accuse her of trying to run his life. he tried to wean himself off the drugs. fights became frequent. he tried to run her over. he fled the house with his gun. he told cheryl he wanted to commit suicide. she told him that decision was up to him, but "i was not going to help." he began crying, and she held him. what were the circumstances? >> you know the stress that every married couple goes through. a couple where one of them is severely wounded, and is struggling with physical and mental wounds and, and the other partner is struggling with the burden of care giving -- it is enormously stressful. i cannot imagine what they went through. are going through. they are still together. there are a great co
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2012 6:00am EDT
a warship, that's different that defends u.s. citizens and our interests around the world. when you try to take away a nation's ability to protect itself, it's an act of war. go back to the beginning. i'm sure you've told this story many times, but what day was the ship you were commanding bombed? 2000.ober 12, >> what were the circumstances? >> we had been operating in the mediterranean for about six and a half weeks had come through the suez canal on the 9th of october, down the red sea. we had been held back until the last possible minute in the european theater of operations. and consequently, we had to go at a high-speed transit, 25 knots, about 30 miles an hour, double the normal speed ships would transit to the middle east. it was because of that transit we went through the strait, rounded the arabian peninsula, we needed fuel. we were below 50%. a ship like uss cole carries over a half million gallons, so we had to find someplace to stop. because of the drawdown in the naval forces over a number of years, if not decades, we had gone from a navy of 4,000 ships following world war
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)